Grape seed extract vs resveratrol - the benefits comparison

The main origin of both grape seed extract vs resveratrol is grapes. The grape seed extract obtains by pulverising, drying, removing and bitter-tasting grape seeds. In contrast to grape seeds, resveratrol derives from grapes skin like those used to make red wine. Both compounds have the same effect on the human body but have different medicinal uses. You can consume grape seed extract for various health purposes than resveratrol. But before using any therapy, first, consult your physician about the possible drug interaction and appropriate dosage.

Grape seed extract vs resveratrol the comparison. Picture of grapes

Occurrence

Resveratrol is a compound that acts as an antioxidant and is mainly present in berries, grapes, and peanuts. These parts of grapes ferment to produce wine; that's why their highest concentration is present in red wine. And wine is the primary food source of resveratrol. On the other hand, grape seed extract derives from whole grapes or grape seeds. Its extract contains several nutrients, such as vitamin E, flavonoids, and linoleic acid. In fact, GSE is the best source of proanthocyanidins. 

Functions of grape seed extract vs resveratrol

Both substances have a powerful antioxidant effect on your body. They can scavenge free radicals, damaging your DNA and killing body cells. In addition, antioxidants play a crucial role in several medical illnesses such as cancer and heart diseases, and aging. The antioxidant activity of grape seed extract is due to oligomerica proanthocyanidin complexes (OPCs). In contrast, resveratrol is a part of grape skin, with an antioxidant effect. Also, resveratrol acts as a phytoestrogen, a plant-based compound, and acts in the same way as the estrogen hormone in the human body.

Effects of grape seed extract vs resveratrol

Because of estrogen-like actions and antioxidant activity in your body, resveratrol is  recommended to treat various diseases. In contrast, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center, GSE antioxidant activity accounts for its active use in treating severe venous insufficiency, edema, high cholesterol, hypertension, and cancer. Also, grape seed extract is suggested for treating poor night vision, hemorrhoids, diabetes, and anti-aging skin purposes. Furthermore, according to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, grape seeds help treat atherosclerosis, skin burns, constipation, and several gastrointestinal diseases and enhance wound healing. However, not widely accepted, scientific studies support the consumption of grape seed extract and resveratrol to treat or prevent several diseases.

Benefits comparison

Both compounds have several health benefits in the human body. Let's discuss the benefits comparison of grape seed extract v/s resveratrol.

Helps in managing high blood pressure

Several studies have shown that grape seed extract affects blood pressure. A review of 15 studies on 800 hypertensive patients has revealed the positive impact of GSE on hypertension. The results showed that the daily intake of 100 to 2000 mg of GSE significantly reduces diastolic and systolic blood pressure by 2.8 mmHg and 6.08 mmHg, respectively.

One more recent study has found that the daily consumption of 300 mg of GSE for six weeks effectively lowers diastolic blood pressure and systolic blood pressure by 5% and 4%, respectively. In contrast, resveratrol helps in reducing both systolic and diastolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients by increasing the production of nitric oxide that relaxes blood vessels.

Supports brain functions

Several human studies have shown that consuming a moderate amount of red wine can prevent cognitive decline due to a high level of resveratrol. It also stops the production of protein fragments (beta-amyloid) in the brain, which leads to Alzheimer's disease in seniors. On the other hand, one animal study has depicted that the gallic acid found in GSE plays a crucial role in inhibiting the production of fibrils in the brain, leading to several brain diseases. In addition, GSE effectively improves cognitive abilities, preventing memory loss and forming amyloid clusters in the brain.

Could prevent cancer

Many animal and test-tube studies have revealed that the consumption of resveratrol and grape seed extract is good in preventing different types of cancer, including skin, gastric, prostrates, and breast cancer. Resveratrol may prevents cancer by stopping the growth of cancer cells, changing gene expression, and hormonal effects. Further studies are needed. At the same time, the presence of proanthocyanidins and flavonoids in grape seed extract is associated with reduced cancer risk. GSE is also effective in increasing the effect of several types of chemotherapy. It appears to have a protective effect against liver toxicity and oxidative stress due to potent antioxidant activity.

Dosages

According to the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, a recommended dose of resveratrol is 500 mg daily. For grape seed extract, the University of Maryland Medical Center recommends a daily dose of 1500 to 300 mg treat chronic venous insufficiency and 200 to 400 mg to treat edema. You can also consume 20 to 200 mg of GSE (grape seed extract) up to 3 times daily to increase your body's antioxidant potential. Grape seed extracts are generally standardized to get 50 to 85 percent of proanthocyanidins. So, before use, first, ask your physician about the appropriate dosage of resveratrol or grape seed extract.

Side effects

According to the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, grape seed extract can cause blood thinning, making it unfit for those with blood disorders or taking anticoagulant drugs such as Coumadin. More research is needed to determine a definitive outcome. It is therefor important to consult with your physician before starting with these supplements.

Conclusion

Both grape seed extract and resveratrol have intense antioxidant activity, which provides several health benefits to your body. But before using, first, consult your physician to know their appropriate dose and prevent side effects.

References

1. https://www.livestrong.com/article/266890-what-is-the-difference-between-resveratrol-grape-seed-extract/


2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5370781/


3. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26568249


4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4288281/


5. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24157371


6. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24171080


7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21871550


8. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4588085/


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